The proportion of employees with employment until further notice continues to increase

Among the employees with research and teaching duties 72 per cent had employment until further notice in 2016, corresponding to 21,100 FTEs. 28 per cent, 8 300 FTEs, thereby had fixed-term employment. Compared to 2015 the proportion of research and teaching employees with employment until further notice has increased by 2 percentage points. Employment until further notice has increased by 6 percentage points since 2008.

The proportion of women with employment until further notice has increased more than the corresponding proportion of men. Since 2008, the increase in the proportion of women with employment until further notice has increased by 8 percentage points, from 62 per cent to 70 per cent. The proportion of men with employment until further notice has increased by 3 percentage points, from 70 per cent to 73 per cent.

Percentage of research and teaching staff who have employment until further notice 2005-2016:

Percentage of research and teaching staff at Swedish HEI:s who have employment until further notice, years 2005-2016

Figure above: In total and by sex

All employees

In October 2016, the number of employees at Swedish higher education institutions (HEIs) amounted to 74,900. The number of employees calculated as FTEs amounted to 60,600. Both the number of employees and the number of FTEs are thereby unchanged compared to last year.

Women and men

The number of women employed at HEIs is 39,100, or 31,300 FTEs. The corresponding number of men is 35,900, or 29,400 FTEs. This means that 52 per cent of all FTEs are women and 48 per cent are men.

Research and teaching employees

The number of employees with research and teaching duties continues to increase. In 2016 they amounted to 35,200. Calculated as FTEs this corresponds to 29 400, of which 13,100 are women and 16,300 men, or 45 per cent women and 55 per cent men. Both the number of employees and FTEs with research and teaching duties have increased with 1 per cent, 300 employees and 200 FTEs, since 2015. Since 2001, the number of employees with research and teaching duties, calculated as FTEs, has increased by 35 per cent. The number has increased in all employment categories except for lecturers. The number of lecturers has continuously decreased for many years.

Uppsala University and Lund University have the largest number of FTEs with research and teaching duties

71 per cent of all employees with research and teaching duties, are employed at the 10 (by number of FTEs) largest HEIs. Uppsala University and Lund University have 3,200 FTEs each, which is more than any other HEI. The University of Gothenburg and Stockholm university follow with 2,600 and 2,400 FTEs respectively.

The largest number of FTEs in medical and health sciences and social sciences

Of all the research and teaching staff, 24 per cent work in the field of medical and health sciences, 7,200 FTEs. An equal share is working in the field of social sciences. Natural sciences follow with 6,300 FTEs, which corresponds to 22 per cent. These fields can be further divided into fields of application. Health sciences and clinical medicine are the two largest fields of application with slightly over 2,100 FTEs each.

The proportion of employees with third-cycle qualifications is unchanged

Of the employees with research and teaching duties at HEIs, 68 per cent have third-cycle qualifications. Third-cycle qualifications consist of degree of doctor, degree of licentiate and other third-cycle educations. Since 2001, the proportion of research and teaching employees with third-cycle qualifications has increased by 12 percentage points, but since 2015 the proportion is unchanged.

Most employees are in the 40-44 age group, and more continue to work after the age of 65

Among research and teaching staff, the largest number of employees are in the 40-44 year age group (5,100 persons, or 14 per cent). Thereafter the number decreases for each age group, and the proportion who are 65 years and older is 7 per cent.

The number of employees who continue to work after the age of 65 has been increasing for several years. More than half (51 per cent) of the employees in the oldest age group are working as professors.